Orphaned Wildlife (OWL) Rehabilitation Centre, Delta

There are several birds which are permanent residents (unable to be released back into the wild) at the OWL (Orphaned Wildlife) Rehabilitation Centre in Delta, British Columbia. Some of these birds are trained as educational birds such as Sarah the Barn Owl to teach people about the work done at the Centre and about her species. CREDIT: Venture Vancouver, SOURCE: www.venturevancouver.com

Sarah the Barn Owl is one of several educational birds at the OWL Rehabilitation Centre and teaches visitors about the work and her species.

STATS
HOURS

Type:

Activity

Season:

All Seasons

Weather:

All Weather

Time:

2 hours

Cost:

By Donation

What to bring:

Camera, Questions, Sense of Curiosity, Hiking Boots

Open on weekends and July and August the Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre (OWL) provides a place for birds of prey from all over the Province of British Columbia to recover from injuries sustained in accidents or by hunting rifles. The Centre sprawls over several acres with several buildings that are off limits to visitors to help birds transition back into the wild once they are fully recovered. The interpretation centre is open to everyone and knowledgeable staff and volunteers teach visitors about their work and the centre as well as introduce people to the twenty permanent birds of prey (including owls and eagles) that live on site.

Delta is a winter home for thousands of birds of prey which migrate from their summer homes to the southern shores of British Columbia. Every year dozens of these majestic birds are injured or left without parents due to accidents or illegal activities. The Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre (OWL) provides treatment and a home for these birds and released them into the wild once they have healed.

The OWL Rehabilitation Centre was registered as a society in 1985 and strives to rescue, rehabilitate and release injured wildlife and educate the public about the centre and its work. Injured birds are brought to the Rehabilitation Centre from all over British Columbia to be treated for broken bones, bullet wounds and feeding problems.

Most birds are rehabilitated and released back into the wild, however, those which are too badly injured become permanent residents of the OWL Centre and are an important part of the educational programs which are presented by the staff and volunteers. Visitors can tour the Centre with a trained volunteer who tells the stories of the resident birds and the region every day during July and August and weekends during the rest of the year. Most of the facilities are off limits to visitors but once a year during the annual Open House the general population can visit most of the buildings on site and possibly see a rehabilitated bird released back into the wild.

Donations are welcome, as well, the Centre needs many other items - a full wish list can be found on their website.

The OWL Rehabilitation Centre provides a sanctuary for injured birds where they can recuperate and then be released back into their natural habitats. Visit the Rehabilitation Centre to learn about the centre and visit its majestic residents.

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Photo and Image Gallery

The Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre in Delta, British Columbia provides a place for birds of prey to recuperate from injuries and then released back into the wild. People can visit the Centre throughout the year to learn about the work done by the staff and volunteers.
Rusty is the only Rough Legged Hawk who is a resident at the OWL (Orphaned Wildlife) Rehabilitation Centre in Delta, British Columbia. Deemed unreleasable after a car hit him and fractured his wing, he now lives on site and is a permanent resident at the Centre.
Isis is one of two resident Goshawks at the OWL Rehabilitation Centre in Delta, British Columbia who sustained injuries which make them unreleasable. These beautiful birds now live in the Centre and help teach people about their species.
Demon and Daisy are the two Barred Owl residents at the OWL (Orphaned Wildlife) Rehabilitation Centre in Delta, British Columbia. Both have residual damage from former injuries and cannot be released so they spend their days at the Centre where visitors can learn about them.
The three Snowy Owls, Kermit, Piggy and Serenity are permanent residents at the OWL (Orphaned Wildlife) Rehabilitation Centre in Delta, British Columbia. These beautiful owls were injured by airplanes and cars and cannot be released into the wild. Snowy Owls are the heaviest and most powerful of the Owl species and are considered some of the most beautiful due to their striking plumage.
Chuck and his cagemates Pepe and Precious are Turkey Vultures which live at the OWL (Orphaned Wildlife) Rehabilitation Centre in Delta, British Columbia. These odd looking birds are scavengers and these three are unable to be released back into the wild due to their injuries but have a wonderful home at the Centre.
There is a long line of cages at the OWL (Orphaned Wildlife) Rehabilitation Centre at the entrance - these are the homes of the birds which call the Centre home and are unable to be released due to their injuries. A trained volunteer takes visitors along the cages introducing them to their birds, their stories and other interesting information.


Location of OWL: Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre

Use the interactive map below to locate and explore the areas around OWL: Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre

3800 - 72nd Street
V4K 3N2


Map of Delta & Point Roberts

Click the brown GEMS on the map to navigate to the other activities within this region

Things to do in Delta and Point Roberts

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