Hollow Tree, Stanley Park

The Hollow Tree in Stanley Park was severely damaged in the 2006 Windstorms that wrecked havoc across Vancouver. The tree sustained damage leading to its closure to the public while its fate was assessed. It will be stabilized and reopened to the public. CREDIT: Venture Vancouver, SOURCE: www.venturevancouver.com

Stanley Park's Hollow Tree was damaged in the severe winds of the 2006 storms requiring support braces to keep the tree upright.

STATS

Type:

Landmark

Season:

All Seasons

Weather:

All Weather

Time:

10 minutes

Cost:

Free

What to bring:

Camera, Sense of Curiosity, Hiking Boots

This spectacular iconic Stanley Park feature has brought thousands of visitors to its roots. The Hollow Tree has for over a century been one of the most photographed elements within the park boundaries. Photos from the early 1900s show horse and buggies backed into the massive trunk to show its girth as well as curious new settlers to the Vancouver area peering out from the depths of the hollow. The site continues to be a popular historic and curious site, a remainder of the old forests that once existed in the Park. Due to the severe damage from the 2006 Windstorm that devastated Stanley Park, the tree has been fenced off temporarily as it is to be re-stabilized. It will soon continue its status as Stanley Park's most famous tree.

A popular photo spot (considered the most photographed spot in Stanley Park), the hollow tree amazed visitors to the park for many decades.

This 40 foot across Western Red Cedar is composed of a large door spaced hollow in a dead tree big enough to fit an entire car.

A plaque is also on site to commemorate the tree that has been a popular attraction since the creation of the Park.

The tree shot to fame in the early years of the Park's inception by a photographer who made his living taking tourist photos in front of the tree. He saved the tree from destruction when it was slated for logging when the road that currently winds through the park. Since then, the tree remained one of Stanley Park's most visited landmarks until the 2006 Wind Storm caused irreparable damage leaving a large portion of the 800 year old stump which has shrunk over one meter.

There has been much debate on whether or not to take down the tree as it may pose a hazard for tourists.

It was to be removed as of a decision made by a tribunal in early 2008, however due to public outcry about the value of the hollow tree as a natural landmark in Stanley Park, the decision was overturned in 2009 as enough money was raised to re-stabilize the tree.

The tree is still viewable, however, it is surrounded by a fence as a precaution until it has been anchored.

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Photo and Image Gallery

The large hollow in the middle of the appropriately named Hollow Tree in Stanley Park is a popular place for visitors to take their photo to demonstrate the sheer size of the opening.


Location of Hollow Tree

Use the interactive map below to locate and explore the areas around Hollow Tree

On the upper roadway near Prospect Point on the western edge of the Park
Stanley Park


Map of Stanley Park

Click the brown GEMS on the map to navigate to the other activities within this region

Things to do in Stanley Park

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Lions Gate Bridge
Prospect Point
2006 Windstorm
Hollow Tree
Beaver Lake in the Center of Stanley Park
Interior Hiking Trails
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Remnants of the Old Stanley Park Zoo
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